FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

OGO™ Compost Toilet runs on a 12v DC power system. Most Off-Grid lifestyles still have some power source to run essentials. Whether you have a deep cell battery and/or utilizing one of the many alternative power sources, OGO™ Compost Toilet can be easily wired to the source or you can buy a power adapter for a 110V outlet.

Either way, we feel this minor power pull is worth it to ensure proper agitation of your compost mixture starts during the time of use to prevent unwanted odor.

working? Well, that is frustrating. Let's walk through some common issues.

  • "I have to press the power button to get the agitator to work."
    • Follow the wiring diagram to ensure your unit is wired correctly. Paying close attention to the timer.
    • Check all connectors and that enough wire is exposed within the connector and is securely inserted. 
    • Incorrect wiring from the provided power cable to your power source WILL short out the timer.
    • Still, need help? Give us a call or email us.
  • "My agitator is not spinning"
    • Do you have power?
      • Follow the wiring diagram to ensure your unit is wired correctly. Paying close attention to the power button and motor.
    • If the unit has power and is wired correctly remove the solids bin and base cover of the unit and press the power button.
      • Does the cog on the motor move freely?
        • If YES, you may have too thick of a mixture that is too thick for the agitator arms to move. The proper medium mixture is key. We suggest using our Coco Coir to make this as easy as possible.
        • If NO, your motor is not working correctly. Inspect for damage and connections. DO NOT OPERATE IF THE MOTOR IS NOT FUNCTIONING CORRECTLY.
        • Still, need help? Give us a call or email us.

Yes.
  • From EPA
  • Can I use a composting toilet on board my vessel?
    • Composting toilets may be considered a Type III marine sanitation device by the U.S. Coast Guard. Type III devices that store sewage and flush water at ambient air pressure and temperature are not subject to formal certification by the U.S. Coast Guard, as long as the device complies with the following requirement: "Be designed to prevent the overboard discharge of treated or untreated sewage or any waste derived from sewage (Type III)." Please note that most composting toilets have not been examined by the U.S. Coast Guard. Instead, in most cases, the device manufacturer attests that the device meets the aforementioned requirements.
  • The contents of both the liquid waste container and the compost chamber must be properly disposed of such that no overboard discharge occurs.
  • See 33 CFR 159.12(a) and 33 CFR 159.53(c) for the relevant statutory language.
  • Coast Guard Definitions
    • Vessel Operators: No person may operate any Vessel having an installed toilet facility unless it is equipped with an installed and operable MSD of a type approved by the U.S. Coast Guard to meet the requirements of 33 CFR Part 159. 
    • Approved MSDs: There are three different types of MSDs that can be certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to meet the requirements in 33 CFR Part 159, each having its own design, certification, and discharge criteria. For more information see 33 CFR 159.53. 
    • Type I is a flow-through discharge device that produces effluent having a fecal coliform bacteria count not greater than 1,000 per 100 milliliters and no visible floating solids. This type of device is typically a physical/chemical-based system that relies on maceration and chlorination. Type I MSDs are issued a Certificate of Approval.  
    • Type II is a flow-through discharge device that produces effluent having a fecal coliform bacteria count not greater than 200 per 100 milliliters and suspended solids not greater than 150 milligrams per liter. This type of device is typically a biological or aerobic digestion-based system.
    • Type III is a device that prevents the overboard discharge of treated or untreated sewage or any waste derived from sewage. This type of device is typically a holding tank and may include other types of technology including incineration, recirculation, and composting. 33 CFR 159.53

  • 25-30 solids depending on the number of people using it. 
  • The cubic volume of the entire solids bin is 785 cubic inches. We recommend starting the fill height of medium about 5-6 inches off the bottom of the solids bin which is about 430 cubic inches of starting material. 
  • The solids bin has about a 10-inch diameter and 10-inch height.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Solverwp- WordPress Theme and Plugin